Callin’ Oates: The Hotline You Don’t Need (But Might Call Anyway)

John Oates (left) and Daryl Hall (right) of pop duo Hall & Oates, seen here in 1987. These days, they're available on your phone. i

John Oates (left) and Daryl Hall (right) of pop duo Hall & Oates, seen here in 1987. These days, they’re available on your phone.

Dave Hogan/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Is it pure whimsy that makes something like “Callin’ Oates” appealing?

If you pick up your phone and call 719-26-OATES — at least as of this writing — you’ll get a computerized woman’s voice telling you what numbers to press to hear one of four Hall & Oates songs.

The question, of course, is … why?

In the age of Spotify, iTunes, YouTube, why would you pick up your phone to listen to a tinny rendition of “Private Eyes,” like you’re on hold with customer service? It’s hard to imagine why this would be an appealing way to listen to anything, unless you were trapped at the bottom of a well. And you had access to a phone. And despite being trapped at the bottom of a well, your biggest priority was listening to “Private Eyes.” Let’s agree that valuing this hotline for its sheer utility requires a fairly elaborate scenario to be

continue http://www.npr.org/sections/monkeysee/2011/12/21/144069758/callin-oates-the-hotline-you-dont-need-but-might-call-anyway

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