science

Did my brain make me do it? Neuroscience and Free Will

Consider the following passage from Ian McEwan’s novel Atonement. It concerns one of the novel’s characters (Briony) as she philosophically reflects on the mystery of human action:

She raised one hand and flexed its fingers and wondered, as she had sometimes done before, how this thing, this machine for gripping, this fleshy spider on the end of her arm, came to be hers, entirely at her command. Or did it have some little life of its own? She bent her finger and straightened it. The mystery was in the instant before it moved, the dividing moment between not moving and moving, when her intention took effect. It was like a wave breaking. If she could only find herself at the crest, she thought, she might find the secret of herself, that part of her that was really in charge.

Is Briony’s quest forlorn? Will she ever find herself at the crest of the wave? The contemporary scientific understanding of human action seems to cast this into some doubt. A variety of studies in the neuroscience of action paint an increasingly mechanistic and subconscious picture of human behaviour. According to these studies, our behaviour is not the product of our intentions or desires or anything like that. It is the product of our neural networks and systems, a complex soup of electrochemical interactions, oftentimes operating beneath our conscious awareness. In other words, our brains control our actions; our selves (in the philosophically important sense of the word ‘self’) do not. This discovery — that our brains ‘make us do it’ and that ‘we’ don’t — is thought to have a number of significant social implications, particularly for our practices of blame and punishment.

Or so a popular line of argument goes. Is this line of argument any good? Christian List and Peter Menzies’s article, ‘My brain made me do it: The exclusion argument against free will and what’s wrong with it’, claims that it is not. In this two-part series, I want to closely examine their arguments. Although I sympathise with parts of their critique, I think their attempt to apply this critique to the recent debates about neuroscience and responsibility are somewhat misleading. I’ll explain why I think this in part two. For the remainder of this part, I’ll focus on their primary argument.

continue http://philosophicaldisquisitions.blogspot.ie/2015/07/did-my-brain-make-me-do-it-neuroscience.html

read part2 here http://ieet.org/index.php/IEET/more/danaher20150708#When:13:06:00Z

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Activity At Yellowstone Cause For Concern, Park Closed To Vehicles

GREAT FALLS –

Rangers at Yellowstone National Park have temporarily closed Upper Terrace Drive near Mammoth Hot Springs to vehicles due to a new thermal feature that is affecting the road.

A press release from the park says that the new feature became “visibly active” in May near the Upper Terrace parking lot, creating new small terraces adjacent to the drive.

Geologists and rangers monitored the thermal feature and found temperatures up to 152 degrees Fahrenheit.

Rangers noticed additional thermal activity this week adjacent to and under the pavement, which triggered the temporary closure.

Thermal imaging shows heat under the pavement as well.

Park geologist Dr. Hank Heasler said, “We have known this area had heat near the surface based on the fact that it does not hold snow in the winter. We drilled two holes a half-meter (20 inches) deep, both of which now have hot water bubbling at the surface or very near the surface.”

continue http://www.kpax.com/story/29568325/road-in-yellowstone-national-park-closed-to-vehicles-due-to-thermal-activity

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